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Sunday, July 26, 2015
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Chinatown Partnership and Art Beyond Sight will host a birthday party and arts festival throughout streets in Chinatown to recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25). This event is free and open to the public. In light of the celebration, local businesses in Chinatown -- a minimally accessible neighborhood of New York City – have made new commitments to augment the accessibility of their venues.
Visitors will enjoy live music, dancing, and art. Co-host Art Beyond Sight will lead those with little to no vision in creating tactile works through touch while the Chinatown Partnership will offer noodle-making demonstrations. Zulu-P, a funk hip-hop collective led by New York City-based singers with developmental disabilities; diaboloTeamNYC, a group of Chinese yoyo performers; opera singer Paulette Penzvalto; and many others will be among the entertainers. New York City cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and The Origami Therapy Association will lead interactive art demonstrations and crafts. The Museum of Modern Art will facilitate the creation of a collaborative community sketchbook that will be modeled to look like a birthday card for ADA25.

The Americans with Disabilities Act’s 25th birthday party is organized by the Chinatown Partnership, (www.chinatownpartnership.org) and Art Beyond Sight (www.artbeyondsight.org), with the support of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (www.nyc.gov/mopd) and CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities. For a full list of participating organizations please visit www.explorechinatown.com.

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Social In Manhattan
Large Crowd of people.
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News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Demographic: 

Chinatown Partnership and Art Beyond Sight will host a birthday party and arts festival throughout streets in Chinatown to recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25). This event is free and open to the public. In light of the celebration, local businesses in Chinatown -- a minimally accessible neighborhood of New York City – have made new commitments to augment the accessibility of their venues.
Visitors will enjoy live music, dancing, and art. Co-host Art Beyond Sight will lead those with little to no vision in creating tactile works through touch while the Chinatown Partnership will offer noodle-making demonstrations. Zulu-P, a funk hip-hop collective led by New York City-based singers with developmental disabilities; diaboloTeamNYC, a group of Chinese yoyo performers; opera singer Paulette Penzvalto; and many others will be among the entertainers. New York City cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and The Origami Therapy Association will lead interactive art demonstrations and crafts. The Museum of Modern Art will facilitate the creation of a collaborative community sketchbook that will be modeled to look like a birthday card for ADA25.

The Americans with Disabilities Act’s 25th birthday party is organized by the Chinatown Partnership, (www.chinatownpartnership.org) and Art Beyond Sight (www.artbeyondsight.org), with the support of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (www.nyc.gov/mopd) and CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities. For a full list of participating organizations please visit www.explorechinatown.com.

News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 12, 2015
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New York
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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -
New York City ran its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan's Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

The day concluded with performances from disabled musicians, dancers and comedians.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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NEW YORK— New York City is hosting its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan’s Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as “Disability Pride Month” in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”

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City stages its first parade for disabled
New York City held its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

“We’re here full-force,” said rapper Namel Norris, 33, who has used a wheelchair since being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. “I thought my life was over, but music is my calling. I have a purpose in life.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he was proud that his city is a national leader in supporting rights for people with disabilities.

The grand marshal was former senator Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

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NEW YORK — New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

“We’re here full force,” said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. “I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he’s proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The grand marshal was former U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

“I may be retired from the Senate, but I’m not retired from the fight,” Harkin said. “We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers.”

De Blasio said his administration is “very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going,” the mayor said, laughing.

About 2 percent of New York’s yellow cabs are accessible, compared to London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.

In New York City, de Blasio declared July as “Disability Pride Month” in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”

Read more here: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2015/07/12/3719063_ny-disability-pride-para...

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The San Luis Obispo Tribune
The inaugural Disability Pride Parade travels along Broadway in New York
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Stephanie Keith
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New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

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“We're here full force,” said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. “I thought my life was over, but music is my calling. I have a purpose in life.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural Disability Pride Parade, saying he's proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The grand marshal was former Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

“I may be retired from the Senate, but I'm not retired from the fight,” Harkin said. “We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers.”

De Blasio said his administration is “very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going,” the mayor said.

About 4% of New York's yellow cabs are accessible, said Allan Fromberg, a spokesman for the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission, compared with London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.

In New York, de Blasio declared July “Disability Pride Month” in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”

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Los Angeles Times
an image of 2 kids in a wheelchair smiling in the Disability Pride Parade
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New York City held its first parade honoring people with disabilities Sunday.
Mayor Bill de Blasio addressed the crowd at the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city for being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people. The parade route at Manhattan's Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as Disability Pride Month in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.
The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement." - AP

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Philly
People participate in the first annual Disability Pride Parade. Two wheelchair users in front and dozens of people marching behind.
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Thousands of people marched through the streets of New York for the city's first Disability Pride Parade Sunday, AFP reports.

People in wheelchairs and with guide dogs and parents carrying their disabled children marched during a hot day through the center of Manhattan after Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the event.

The event, subtitled "Inclusion, Awareness, Visibility" saw people carrying signs asking for better access to public transport and housing.

"Disabled and proud," said a sign carried by a woman in a wheelchair.

A man carried another sign reading: "Just because I can't speak doesn't mean I don't have a lot to say."

Other signs demanded police stop killing disabled people, an issue recently in the spotlight in the country after police arrests ended in disabled peoples' deaths.

De Blasio said July was "disability pride month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

The march organized by the city is scheduled to be an annual event.

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14 Street Union Square Station entrance
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New York City holds its first annual Disability Pride Parade on Sunday, featuring a procession from Madison Square Park down Broadway to Union Square. Let’s see what it takes to participate.

You can take the subway to an N, Q and R station at Madison Square, where 23rd St. and Broadway meets 5th Ave. Oh, sorry, it’s not wheelchair accessible.

The same goes for the No. 6 stop a block away at 23rd and Park, the PATH station on Sixth Ave., the No. 1 station at Seventh Ave. and 23rd and the C/E stop at Eighth Ave.

When the parade is over, the Union Square station does have elevators that give access to the L and N/Q/R lines, but not to the No. 4, 5 or 6 trains.

So how about hailing a yellow cab? Of the 13,587 cruising the streets, only 581, or 4%, are wheelchair accessible. Or you could call the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s Accessible Dispatch program through 311. We tried, and got an operator who could not say how long the wait for a cab would be (waits average 20 minutes).

Ten minutes later, we called back and spoke with an operator who offered to connect us with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s Access-A-Ride program. Unfortunately, you have to be pre-enrolled and reserve a ride a day or two in advance.

Then, a brainstorm. What about Uber, the super-popular smart-phone hail-a-car application? Of 19,969 Uber cars, not a single one can accommodate a wheelchair.

For official New York, the word shame should replace pride in the name of this parade.

Institution: 
NY Daily News

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