Diversity

Photo credit: 
Chinatown Partnership Local Development Corporation
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 24, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

The Chinatown Partnership, in collaboration with Art Beyond Sight, Disability Pride and support from the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, celebrated ADA's legacy by promoting access for all with this inclusive festival. The 2016 Chinatown Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party, had educators and artists from cultural organizations educating and entertaining visitors of all abilities. People were able learn about offerings from NYC government organizations, and agencies providing services to people with disabilities.

Crowd of parade marchers wearing purple crowns
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

New York celebrated the second annual Disability Pride with a colorful parade, marching from Union Square Park to Madison Square Park. Disability Pride NYC is a non-profit started by Mike LeDonne who’s 10 year old daughter is disabled. The mission of Disability Pride NYC is to promote inclusion, awareness, and visibility of people with disabilities, and redefine public perception of disability. Their goal is to establish an annual Disability Pride parade in New York City and to support people with disabilities in whatever way they can.

Two dancers highfiving each other at parade
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
Blog
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

Many who have declining health feel ashamed of their bodies, and in time, may also feel ashamed of themselves. Friends stop reaching out as health issues just sound like “drama” to most people who have never faced a health crisis. Some have been forced to leave behind a career, or dreams they once held dear. Although it sounds harsh, it’s not uncommon at all for family members to tease or bully as individuals change physically and/or mentally, leaving them extremely self conscious. People can be very judgmental of body shapes, walking aids, and challenges they don’t understand. Others are quick to call out what they see as “inconsistencies,” even strangers in public call those in wheel chairs “liars” at times when they don’t understand that paralysis isn’t the only reason one might need the aid of wheels.

It’s no wonder that people start to lose their self worth, and isolate themselves as a disability changes them.

You know what? SCREW EVERYONE!

So, this isn’t a news flash, but people don’t get it, and they don’t get you. You, my dear, have so much to be proud of, and SO MUCH to share with the world!

You are an over-comer, a warrior, a never-giving-up wheel rolling, cane sporting, walker toting, re-inventing, hope finding, doing it anyway, sometimes invisible illness (but never invisible)- always working to conquer your challenges: BRAVE fighter! Damn straight you should be proud!!!

You don’t have to prove how much pain you’re in every day, how badly cancer changed your body, you don’t have to show your prosthetic, or tell anyone what your mental illness is… unless you want to. You are living proof of pure strength. You don’t have to work to be an inspiration to anyone, but hey- you already are, kiddo. You’re pretty spectacular just the way you are, in the body you have right now.

Please don’t keep your amazing self on lock down. You’re the only you this world will ever have! Heart (((hugs))) going out.