Informative

Photo credit: 
Chinatown Partnership Local Development Corporation
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 24, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

The Chinatown Partnership, in collaboration with Art Beyond Sight, Disability Pride and support from the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, celebrated ADA's legacy by promoting access for all with this inclusive festival. The 2016 Chinatown Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party, had educators and artists from cultural organizations educating and entertaining visitors of all abilities. People were able learn about offerings from NYC government organizations, and agencies providing services to people with disabilities.

Photo credit: 
riglobal
Announcements
Original Published Date: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

More than 5,000 disabled people rolled, motored and strolled up Broadway to Madison Square Park on Sunday for the second annual Disability Pride Parade, one of the largest gatherings celebrating and advocating for disability rights in New York City.

During a rally before the parade, Richard Buery, the Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives, announced the city’s first-ever report on the state of people with disabilities and interagency plans to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities across the five boroughs. “With this plan, the we aee paving the way for the rest of the country, bringing together city agencies to prioritize accessibility to resources and services,” Buery told a cheering crowd.

Through collaboration with dozens of city agencies, among other initiatives, New York will increase the pool of accessible and affordable apartments for people with disabilities, expand dispatch services for accessible taxis and launch the At Work initiative, which will provide access to employment opportunities for a minimum of 700 unemployed or underemployed people with disabilities.

“Being a life-long New Yorker and a wheelchair user, I understand from experience the complexity that people with disabilities face on a daily basis – from navigating our streets to obtaining needed services,” said Vincent Calise, the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Persons with Disabilities. “This is truly an unprecedented undertaking: never in the history of NYC government have so many city agencies worked together on a comprehensive report to advance the interests of New Yorkers with disabilities. I am confident that the progress we make will be unprecedented as well,”

RI Secretary-General, Venus Ilagan, joined Daniela Bas, the Director of the Division for Social Policy and Development the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Calise and the many others from the Mayor’s Office of People with Disabilities, in helping New York “remember that people with disabilities belong to society, deserve equal rights and should honor themselves,” she said. Ilagan became disabled due to childhood polio; Bas from a tumor on her spine at age six; and Calise during a mountain biking accident more than 20 years ago.

“Growing up, there were no specific laws in favour of children with disabilities, so my parents and I had to be creative in pioneering different ways of overcoming physical and attitudinal barriers, along with stigma and discrimination,” Bas has said of her paraplegia. “This made me resilient, persistent and a quick problem solver – qualities that have been valuable to me in life.”

The parade, started by renowned jazz pianist, Mike LaDonne, whose daughter suffers from Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic disorder that has rendered her he without speech, legally blind and mostly wheelchair-bound, said he founded the parade to “break the stereotypes and show people that these people deserve all the same respect and same chances as everyone else.

“It was a no-brainer,” he said. “We have a rich history of pride events, and want to build on that and more with our friends and allies who hold fantastic events around the U.S.”

Serving as Grand Marshals of the parade were disability rights leaders Marilyn Saviola, who has spent her life advocating for health services for disabled women, and Ambassador to the UN from Korea, Oh Joon, the outgoing President of the Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The parade began and ended with rallies, and vendors lined the streets to advertise services and even give some a taste of disability sport, such as the New York Road Runners, who introduced chair racing. Disability Pride, coincided with the 25th anniversary of the signing of the American’s with Disability Act (ADA) in 1990 by President George HW Bush. So far, only Chicago and Philadelphia have sustained annual disability marches, with the first one taking place in Boston in 1990. To see updates: www.disabilitypridenyc.org

A portrait picture of Ban Ki-moon
Photo credit: 
United Nations
Announcements
Original Published Date: 
Monday, July 11, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

The following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's message for the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, in New York, today:

I am pleased to send my warmest greetings to the annual New York City Disability Pride Parade. Please accept my best wishes as you celebrate the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I commend the leading role of New York City in showing the world the pride that people with disabilities have in exercising their civil rights and freedoms.

Worldwide, more than 1 billion people live with disabilities. The United Nations has committed itself since its foundation to the full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of society and development.

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, of which the United States is a signatory. This Convention and the Americans with Disabilities Act share the same goal of the full and equal participation of people with disabilities in society and bring us together to reaffirm our commitment to an inclusive and accessible environment for all.

New York City has an impressive record of promoting accessibility in transportation, public buildings and services. This makes it possible for people with disabilities from all over the world to participate in international meetings here, contributing to your reputation as an inclusive and vibrant global capital.

As the United States continues to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act, let us continue to take concrete action together for inclusive and accessible societies for all.

Crowd of parade marchers wearing purple crowns
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

New York celebrated the second annual Disability Pride with a colorful parade, marching from Union Square Park to Madison Square Park. Disability Pride NYC is a non-profit started by Mike LeDonne who’s 10 year old daughter is disabled. The mission of Disability Pride NYC is to promote inclusion, awareness, and visibility of people with disabilities, and redefine public perception of disability. Their goal is to establish an annual Disability Pride parade in New York City and to support people with disabilities in whatever way they can.

Two dancers highfiving each other at parade
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
Blog
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

Many who have declining health feel ashamed of their bodies, and in time, may also feel ashamed of themselves. Friends stop reaching out as health issues just sound like “drama” to most people who have never faced a health crisis. Some have been forced to leave behind a career, or dreams they once held dear. Although it sounds harsh, it’s not uncommon at all for family members to tease or bully as individuals change physically and/or mentally, leaving them extremely self conscious. People can be very judgmental of body shapes, walking aids, and challenges they don’t understand. Others are quick to call out what they see as “inconsistencies,” even strangers in public call those in wheel chairs “liars” at times when they don’t understand that paralysis isn’t the only reason one might need the aid of wheels.

It’s no wonder that people start to lose their self worth, and isolate themselves as a disability changes them.

You know what? SCREW EVERYONE!

So, this isn’t a news flash, but people don’t get it, and they don’t get you. You, my dear, have so much to be proud of, and SO MUCH to share with the world!

You are an over-comer, a warrior, a never-giving-up wheel rolling, cane sporting, walker toting, re-inventing, hope finding, doing it anyway, sometimes invisible illness (but never invisible)- always working to conquer your challenges: BRAVE fighter! Damn straight you should be proud!!!

You don’t have to prove how much pain you’re in every day, how badly cancer changed your body, you don’t have to show your prosthetic, or tell anyone what your mental illness is… unless you want to. You are living proof of pure strength. You don’t have to work to be an inspiration to anyone, but hey- you already are, kiddo. You’re pretty spectacular just the way you are, in the body you have right now.

Please don’t keep your amazing self on lock down. You’re the only you this world will ever have! Heart (((hugs))) going out.

Man in front of pharmacy shelves
Photo credit: 
John Brigande Ph.D.
Announcements
Blog
News
Press
Original Published Date: 
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
City: 
New York
Demographic: 

I was about 9 when hearing loss in my left ear was first detected. The audiologist explained to me that as a result, I may not be able to hear birds singing as easily, and that I may need to concentrate more to understand words starting with “sh,” “k,” or “t.” Sensing my alarm, she tried to reassure me by saying it was unlikely that the hearing loss would affect both ears, and if it did, it would likely not be to the same extent.

Managing the loss of a primary sense is all about adaptation. In grade school, I simply tilted my right ear toward sound sources. Over time my hearing loss became bilateral and progressive, and its cause remains unknown. In graduate school I began using hearing aids and later received a cochlear implant in my left ear. I continue to use a hearing aid in my right ear, and thankfully for the past eight years, my hearing has remained stable, if stably poor.

I have always compensated. At Boston College (where I received my undergraduate, Master’s, and Ph.D., all in the biological sciences) I sat in the front seat of my classes, as close to the speaker as possible. I asked my professors and classmates to face me when they spoke so I could use visual cues to enhance oral comprehension. During postdoctoral training in auditory neuroscience at Purdue University, I was given complimentary assistive listening technology upon my arrival to the lab.

While I do not consider my hearing loss to be a profound limitation personally or professionally, it has certainly sculpted my career path. When picking my area of scientific focus, I settled on a career in auditory neuroscience to better understand hearing loss.

I also reasoned that the auditory research conferences and meetings I’d be attending would likely have assistive listening technology to allow me to participate more fully. I have benefited immeasurably from the scientific community that makes up the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, whose meetings have world-class assistive listening technologies and interpreter services plus overwhelming support of members who have hearing loss.

As I entered my 40s, I experienced vertigo for the first time. The clinical data do not fit with a diagnosis of Ménière’s disease, and the link between my vertigo and hearing loss is unclear.

When I have an acute attack of dizziness, my visual field scrolls from right to left very quickly so that I must close my eyes to avoid profound motion sickness and vomiting. I must lie down until the dizziness subsides, which is usually 12 to 16 hours. I honestly cannot do anything—I can only hope to fall asleep quickly.

Vertigo is a profound limitation for me. With no disrespect or insensitivity intended toward the hearing impaired community—of which I am a passionate member—I would take hearing loss over vertigo in a heartbeat. Dizziness incapacitates me, and I cannot be an effective researcher, educator, husband, or father. Some people perceive an aura before their dizziness occurs, but I do not get any advance warning. Unlike hearing loss, I cannot manage my dizziness—it takes hold and lets go when it wants to.

I recall one episode especially vividly. I was invited to give a seminar at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Disorders (NIDCD) and experienced a severe attack just hours before my flight. Vertigo forced me to reschedule my visit, which was tremendously frustrating. That night, I slept in the bathroom (my best solution when vertigo hits). Vestibular (balance) dysfunction is quite simply a game changer.   

A satisfying part of my research involves trying to define treatments for hearing loss and dizziness. Usher syndrome is a condition combining hearing, balance, and vision disorders. In Usher syndrome type 1, infants are born deaf and have severe vestibular problems; vision abnormalities appear by around age 10. In working with a group of dedicated colleagues at various institutions, we have evidence that fetal administration of a drug in mice with Usher syndrome type 1 can prevent balance abnormalities.

As part of HHF’s Hearing Restoration Project (HRP) consortium, I have been working on testing gene candidates in mice for their ability to trigger hair cell regeneration. This research is exciting as it is leading the HRP into phase 2 of its strategic plan, with phase 3 involving further testing for drug therapies. The probability is that manipulating a single gene will not provide lasting hearing restoration, and that we will need to figure out how to manipulate multiple genes in concert to achieve the best therapeutic outcomes.

It is an exciting time to be a neuroscientist interested in trying to find ways to help patients with hearing loss and balance issues. I am hopeful that we will make progress in defining new ways to treat and even prevent vertigo in the near future and ultimately to discover a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus.

 

Hearing Restoration Project consortium member John V. Brigande, Ph.D., is a developmental neurobiologist at the Oregon Hearing Research Center. He also teaches in the Neuroscience Graduate Program and in the Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the Oregon Health & Science University.

 

 

Your financial support will help ensure we can continue this vital research in order to find a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus in our lifetime. Please donate today to fund the top scientific minds working collaboratively toward a common goal.For more information or to make a donation, email us at development@hhf.org

Your help provides hope.

 

This blog was republished with permission of the Hearing Health Foundation (HHF.org).

Lane Harwell speaking
Photo credit: 
Lane Harwell, Executive Director, Dance/NYC (Credit: Jeffrey Lee, On The Spot Image)
News
Press
Original Published Date: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 
Demographic: 

It's time for a new understanding of disability, especially in the arts" - by Lane Harwell, Executive Director, Dance/NYC

Read more of his article on Fox News online.

Institution: 
Dance/NYC
Man performs a lightshow
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

NYC TO CELEBRATE 25 YEARS OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT WITH PARTY

Chinatown Partnership and Art Beyond Sight will host a birthday party and arts festival throughout streets in Chinatown to recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25) on Sunday, July 26th, from 11am until 4pm on Mott Street, from Canal to Worth Streets. This event is free and open to the public. In light of the celebration, local businesses in Chinatown -- a minimally accessible neighborhood of New York City – have made new commitments to augment the accessibility of their venues.

Visitors will enjoy live music, dancing, and art. Co-host Art Beyond Sight will lead those with little to no vision in creating tactile works through touch while the Chinatown Partnership will offer noodle-making demonstrations. Zulu-P, a funk hip-hop collective led by New York City-based singers with developmental disabilities; diaboloTeamNYC, a group of Chinese yoyo performers; opera singer Paulette Penzvalto; and many others will be among the entertainers. New York City cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and The Origami Therapy Association will lead interactive art demonstrations and crafts. The Museum of Modern Art will facilitate the creation of a collaborative community sketchbook that will be modeled to look like a birthday card for ADA25.

The Americans with Disabilities Act’s 25th birthday party is organized by the Chinatown Partnership, (www.chinatownpartnership.org) and Art Beyond Sight (www.artbeyondsight.org), with the support of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (www.nyc.gov/mopd) and CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities. For a full list of participating organizations please visit www.explorechinatown.com.

Cost: Free

Institution: 
Eventful
A large crowd of people in front of a carnival ride.
Blog
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Demographic: 

Chinatown Partnership and Art Beyond Sight will host a birthday party and arts festival throughout streets in Chinatown to recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25). This event is free and open to the public. In light of the celebration, local businesses in Chinatown -- a minimally accessible neighborhood of New York City – have made new commitments to augment the accessibility of their venues.
Visitors will enjoy live music, dancing, and art. Co-host Art Beyond Sight will lead those with little to no vision in creating tactile works through touch while the Chinatown Partnership will offer noodle-making demonstrations. Zulu-P, a funk hip-hop collective led by New York City-based singers with developmental disabilities; diaboloTeamNYC, a group of Chinese yoyo performers; opera singer Paulette Penzvalto; and many others will be among the entertainers. New York City cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and The Origami Therapy Association will lead interactive art demonstrations and crafts. The Museum of Modern Art will facilitate the creation of a collaborative community sketchbook that will be modeled to look like a birthday card for ADA25.

The Americans with Disabilities Act’s 25th birthday party is organized by the Chinatown Partnership, (www.chinatownpartnership.org) and Art Beyond Sight (www.artbeyondsight.org), with the support of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (www.nyc.gov/mopd) and CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities. For a full list of participating organizations please visit www.explorechinatown.com.

Institution: 
The Villager
People crowded in a area indoors
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Demographic: 

Chinatown Partnership and Art Beyond Sight will host a birthday party and arts festival throughout streets in Chinatown to recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25). This event is free and open to the public. In light of the celebration, local businesses in Chinatown -- a minimally accessible neighborhood of New York City – have made new commitments to augment the accessibility of their venues.
Visitors will enjoy live music, dancing, and art. Co-host Art Beyond Sight will lead those with little to no vision in creating tactile works through touch while the Chinatown Partnership will offer noodle-making demonstrations. Zulu-P, a funk hip-hop collective led by New York City-based singers with developmental disabilities; diaboloTeamNYC, a group of Chinese yoyo performers; opera singer Paulette Penzvalto; and many others will be among the entertainers. New York City cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and The Origami Therapy Association will lead interactive art demonstrations and crafts. The Museum of Modern Art will facilitate the creation of a collaborative community sketchbook that will be modeled to look like a birthday card for ADA25.

The Americans with Disabilities Act’s 25th birthday party is organized by the Chinatown Partnership, (www.chinatownpartnership.org) and Art Beyond Sight (www.artbeyondsight.org), with the support of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (www.nyc.gov/mopd) and CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities. For a full list of participating organizations please visit www.explorechinatown.com.

Price: Free

Institution: 
Social In New York

Pages