Disability Pride Parade Preparation

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Chinatown Partnership Local Development Corporation
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Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 24, 2016
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New York
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The Chinatown Partnership, in collaboration with Art Beyond Sight, Disability Pride and support from the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, celebrated ADA's legacy by promoting access for all with this inclusive festival. The 2016 Chinatown Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party, had educators and artists from cultural organizations educating and entertaining visitors of all abilities. People were able learn about offerings from NYC government organizations, and agencies providing services to people with disabilities.

A portrait picture of Ban Ki-moon
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United Nations
Announcements
Original Published Date: 
Monday, July 11, 2016
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New York
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The following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's message for the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, in New York, today:

I am pleased to send my warmest greetings to the annual New York City Disability Pride Parade. Please accept my best wishes as you celebrate the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I commend the leading role of New York City in showing the world the pride that people with disabilities have in exercising their civil rights and freedoms.

Worldwide, more than 1 billion people live with disabilities. The United Nations has committed itself since its foundation to the full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of society and development.

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, of which the United States is a signatory. This Convention and the Americans with Disabilities Act share the same goal of the full and equal participation of people with disabilities in society and bring us together to reaffirm our commitment to an inclusive and accessible environment for all.

New York City has an impressive record of promoting accessibility in transportation, public buildings and services. This makes it possible for people with disabilities from all over the world to participate in international meetings here, contributing to your reputation as an inclusive and vibrant global capital.

As the United States continues to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act, let us continue to take concrete action together for inclusive and accessible societies for all.

Two dancers highfiving each other at parade
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
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Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
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New York
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Many who have declining health feel ashamed of their bodies, and in time, may also feel ashamed of themselves. Friends stop reaching out as health issues just sound like “drama” to most people who have never faced a health crisis. Some have been forced to leave behind a career, or dreams they once held dear. Although it sounds harsh, it’s not uncommon at all for family members to tease or bully as individuals change physically and/or mentally, leaving them extremely self conscious. People can be very judgmental of body shapes, walking aids, and challenges they don’t understand. Others are quick to call out what they see as “inconsistencies,” even strangers in public call those in wheel chairs “liars” at times when they don’t understand that paralysis isn’t the only reason one might need the aid of wheels.

It’s no wonder that people start to lose their self worth, and isolate themselves as a disability changes them.

You know what? SCREW EVERYONE!

So, this isn’t a news flash, but people don’t get it, and they don’t get you. You, my dear, have so much to be proud of, and SO MUCH to share with the world!

You are an over-comer, a warrior, a never-giving-up wheel rolling, cane sporting, walker toting, re-inventing, hope finding, doing it anyway, sometimes invisible illness (but never invisible)- always working to conquer your challenges: BRAVE fighter! Damn straight you should be proud!!!

You don’t have to prove how much pain you’re in every day, how badly cancer changed your body, you don’t have to show your prosthetic, or tell anyone what your mental illness is… unless you want to. You are living proof of pure strength. You don’t have to work to be an inspiration to anyone, but hey- you already are, kiddo. You’re pretty spectacular just the way you are, in the body you have right now.

Please don’t keep your amazing self on lock down. You’re the only you this world will ever have! Heart (((hugs))) going out.

Participants at the parade getting ready to march
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On Sunday, July 12th, UCP of NYC joined thousands of New Yorkers for the Inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. With an estimated 200 participants, UCP of NYC was one of the largest groups marching, carrying wonderful awareness-raising signs to celebrate. July has been declared Disability Pride month by Mayor de Blasio and also marks the 25th Anniversary of the signing of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

Thank you to everyone who came out to cheer us on and make the first parade of its kind in NYC a success.

The full story from the Associated Press:

New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

"We're here full force," said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. "I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life."

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he's proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The grand marshal was former U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

"I may be retired from the Senate, but I'm not retired from the fight," Harkin said. "We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers."

De Blasio said his administration is "very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going," the mayor said, laughing.

About 4 percent of New York's yellow cabs are accessible, said Allan Fromberg, a spokesman for the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission, compared to London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.

In New York City, de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

Institution: 
United Cerebral Palso
A group of people taking a picture together while one is holding a sign saying "access is a civil right"
Photo credit: 
Tiffany Yu
Blog
Original Published Date: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
City: 
New York

We were so excited to march with around 3,000 participants in New York's inaugural Disability Pride Parade this past Sunday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the event with remarks and former U.S. Senator Tom Harkin, who sponsored the Americans with Disabilities Act 25 years ago, served as grand marshal. Earlier in the month, Mayor de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the ADA, which aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

I thought this quote from The Wall Street Journal resonated with the work we are doing with Diversability.
“Seeing people with various disabilities gathered together was unusual [...] This is probably the only place you ever see every facet of the community come together. We’re often divided by diagnosis.”
— Alex Elegudin, president of advocacy group Wheeling Forward
We are excited to be hosting our next event alongside the city's programming to celebrate!

It was also great to see some Diversability community members and friends! You'll find a handful of photos from the event below. Unfortunately, there wasn't much live press coverage of the event, as shared by creator of the DiversAble Model Project Amanda Frantz.

Institution: 
Diversability
News
Original Published Date: 
Monday, July 13, 2015
City: 
New York

New York - Thousands of people marched through the streets of New York for the city's first Disability Pride Parade on Sunday.
People in wheelchairs and with guide dogs and parents carrying their disabled children marched during a hot day through the centre of Manhattan after Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the event.
The event, subtitled “Inclusion, Awareness, Visibility” saw people carrying signs asking for better access to public transport and housing.
“Disabled and proud,” said a sign carried by a woman in a wheelchair.
A man carried another sign reading: “Just because I can't speak doesn't mean I don't have a lot to say.”
Other signs demanded police stop killing disabled people, an issue recently in the spotlight in the country after police arrests ended in disabled peoples' deaths.
De Blasio said July was “disability pride month” in honour of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
The march organised by the city is scheduled to be an annual event.
AFP

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IOL News
Photo credit: 
Getty Images- Stephanie Keith
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 12, 2015
City: 
New York

On July 12, New York City hosted a parade (the NYC Disability Pride Parade) supporting people with disabilities. This is the first time the city has hosted the NYC Disability Pride Parade, which many people participated in. Many participants in the NYC Disability Pride Parade headed up Broadway with their canes as well as wheelchairs, and many also had guide dogs. The NYC Disability Pride Parade had more than 3,000 participants, and Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked things off. He said that he was proud that NYC is a leader in supporting disabled people’s rights.

As the mayor continued to speak at the NYC Disability Pride Parade, he said that he was committed on the issue of accessibility when it comes to taxis cabs in the city. According to New York Post, around 4 percent of the cabs in the city are handicapped accessible, but over in London, every taxi cab can be accessed by those in a wheelchair.

According to SFGate, Tom Harkin, a former United States Senator, served as the NYC Disability Pride Parade’s grand marshal, which was suiting considering he sponsored the Americans With Disability Act more than 20 years ago.

As he stood in front of a huge crowd at the NYC Disability Pride Parade, Harkin said that he may no longer be a senator, as he has retired, but he was not retired from the fight. As Harkin continued to speak at the NYC Disability Pride Parade, he went on to say that when companies hire people who have disabilities, then they get the most loyal workers, as well as the most productive ones and the best of the best.

One woman who participated in the NYC Disability Pride Parade was seen with a sign that read “disabled and proud,” and others were seen with their own signs. Another sign read “achieve, I don’t let my disability stop me,” but there were many other signs at the NYC Disability Pride Parade, and they featured words of encouragement, according to Daily Mail.

A woman who participated in the NYC Disability Pride Parade said that the parade was powerful because it makes people realize that people are not struggling alone, and it is a problem that people can all work together to get through.

The first ever NYC Disability Pride Parade was a huge hit and it was fitting for it to take place in July. This is because July has been dubbed as “Disability Pride Month” by the mayor. This means that the NYC Disability Pride Parade will likely take place again next July.

The NYC Disability Pride Parade was just part of a series of events that relate to those with disabilities. Those who are in Brooklyn can go to the Brooklyn Historical Society and check out an exhibit there. The exhibit is titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”

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Inquisitr
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 12, 2015
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New York
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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -
New York City ran its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan's Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

The day concluded with performances from disabled musicians, dancers and comedians.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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myfoxny.com
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NEW YORK— New York City is hosting its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan’s Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as “Disability Pride Month” in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”

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WPIX
News
City: 
New York
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NEW YORK (AP) — New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

"We're here full force," said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. "I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life."

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he's proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The grand marshal was former U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

"I may be retired from the Senate, but I'm not retired from the fight," Harkin said. "We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers."

De Blasio said his administration is "very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going," the mayor said, laughing.

About 2 percent of New York's yellow cabs are accessible, compared to London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.

In New York City, de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

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