Disability Pride Parade Preparation

The Chinatown Partnership, in collaboration with Art Beyond Sight, Disability Pride and support from the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, celebrated ADA's legacy by promoting access for all with this inclusive festival. The 2016 Chinatown Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party, had educators and artists from cultural organizations educating and entertaining visitors of all abilities. People were able learn about offerings from NYC government organizations, and agencies providing services to people with disabilities.

The following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's message for the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, in New York, today:

I am pleased to send my warmest greetings to the annual New York City Disability Pride Parade. Please accept my best wishes as you celebrate the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I commend the leading role of New York City in showing the world the pride that people with disabilities have in exercising their civil rights and freedoms.

Many who have declining health feel ashamed of their bodies, and in time, may also feel ashamed of themselves. Friends stop reaching out as health issues just sound like “drama” to most people who have never faced a health crisis. Some have been forced to leave behind a career, or dreams they once held dear. Although it sounds harsh, it’s not uncommon at all for family members to tease or bully as individuals change physically and/or mentally, leaving them extremely self conscious. People can be very judgmental of body shapes, walking aids, and challenges they don’t understand.

On Sunday, July 12th, UCP of NYC joined thousands of New Yorkers for the Inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. With an estimated 200 participants, UCP of NYC was one of the largest groups marching, carrying wonderful awareness-raising signs to celebrate. July has been declared Disability Pride month by Mayor de Blasio and also marks the 25th Anniversary of the signing of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

Thank you to everyone who came out to cheer us on and make the first parade of its kind in NYC a success.

The full story from the Associated Press:

We were so excited to march with around 3,000 participants in New York's inaugural Disability Pride Parade this past Sunday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the event with remarks and former U.S. Senator Tom Harkin, who sponsored the Americans with Disabilities Act 25 years ago, served as grand marshal. Earlier in the month, Mayor de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the ADA, which aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

New York - Thousands of people marched through the streets of New York for the city's first Disability Pride Parade on Sunday.
People in wheelchairs and with guide dogs and parents carrying their disabled children marched during a hot day through the centre of Manhattan after Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the event.
The event, subtitled “Inclusion, Awareness, Visibility” saw people carrying signs asking for better access to public transport and housing.
“Disabled and proud,” said a sign carried by a woman in a wheelchair.

On July 12, New York City hosted a parade (the NYC Disability Pride Parade) supporting people with disabilities. This is the first time the city has hosted the NYC Disability Pride Parade, which many people participated in. Many participants in the NYC Disability Pride Parade headed up Broadway with their canes as well as wheelchairs, and many also had guide dogs. The NYC Disability Pride Parade had more than 3,000 participants, and Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked things off. He said that he was proud that NYC is a leader in supporting disabled people’s rights.

NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -
New York City ran its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan's Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

NEW YORK— New York City is hosting its first parade honoring people with disabilities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke Sunday to kick off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. He said he was proud of the city being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The parade route started at Manhattan’s Madison Square Park and went along Broadway to Union Square Park.

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

"We're here full force," said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. "I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life."

Pages