Families (adults and children together)

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Chinatown Partnership Local Development Corporation
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 24, 2016
City: 
New York
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Types of Culture: 
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The Chinatown Partnership, in collaboration with Art Beyond Sight, Disability Pride and support from the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, celebrated ADA's legacy by promoting access for all with this inclusive festival. The 2016 Chinatown Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party, had educators and artists from cultural organizations educating and entertaining visitors of all abilities. People were able learn about offerings from NYC government organizations, and agencies providing services to people with disabilities.

Photo credit: 
riglobal
Announcements
Original Published Date: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
City: 
New York
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More than 5,000 disabled people rolled, motored and strolled up Broadway to Madison Square Park on Sunday for the second annual Disability Pride Parade, one of the largest gatherings celebrating and advocating for disability rights in New York City.

During a rally before the parade, Richard Buery, the Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives, announced the city’s first-ever report on the state of people with disabilities and interagency plans to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities across the five boroughs. “With this plan, the we aee paving the way for the rest of the country, bringing together city agencies to prioritize accessibility to resources and services,” Buery told a cheering crowd.

Through collaboration with dozens of city agencies, among other initiatives, New York will increase the pool of accessible and affordable apartments for people with disabilities, expand dispatch services for accessible taxis and launch the At Work initiative, which will provide access to employment opportunities for a minimum of 700 unemployed or underemployed people with disabilities.

“Being a life-long New Yorker and a wheelchair user, I understand from experience the complexity that people with disabilities face on a daily basis – from navigating our streets to obtaining needed services,” said Vincent Calise, the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Persons with Disabilities. “This is truly an unprecedented undertaking: never in the history of NYC government have so many city agencies worked together on a comprehensive report to advance the interests of New Yorkers with disabilities. I am confident that the progress we make will be unprecedented as well,”

RI Secretary-General, Venus Ilagan, joined Daniela Bas, the Director of the Division for Social Policy and Development the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Calise and the many others from the Mayor’s Office of People with Disabilities, in helping New York “remember that people with disabilities belong to society, deserve equal rights and should honor themselves,” she said. Ilagan became disabled due to childhood polio; Bas from a tumor on her spine at age six; and Calise during a mountain biking accident more than 20 years ago.

“Growing up, there were no specific laws in favour of children with disabilities, so my parents and I had to be creative in pioneering different ways of overcoming physical and attitudinal barriers, along with stigma and discrimination,” Bas has said of her paraplegia. “This made me resilient, persistent and a quick problem solver – qualities that have been valuable to me in life.”

The parade, started by renowned jazz pianist, Mike LaDonne, whose daughter suffers from Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic disorder that has rendered her he without speech, legally blind and mostly wheelchair-bound, said he founded the parade to “break the stereotypes and show people that these people deserve all the same respect and same chances as everyone else.

“It was a no-brainer,” he said. “We have a rich history of pride events, and want to build on that and more with our friends and allies who hold fantastic events around the U.S.”

Serving as Grand Marshals of the parade were disability rights leaders Marilyn Saviola, who has spent her life advocating for health services for disabled women, and Ambassador to the UN from Korea, Oh Joon, the outgoing President of the Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The parade began and ended with rallies, and vendors lined the streets to advertise services and even give some a taste of disability sport, such as the New York Road Runners, who introduced chair racing. Disability Pride, coincided with the 25th anniversary of the signing of the American’s with Disability Act (ADA) in 1990 by President George HW Bush. So far, only Chicago and Philadelphia have sustained annual disability marches, with the first one taking place in Boston in 1990. To see updates: www.disabilitypridenyc.org

A portrait picture of Ban Ki-moon
Photo credit: 
United Nations
Announcements
Original Published Date: 
Monday, July 11, 2016
City: 
New York
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The following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's message for the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, in New York, today:

I am pleased to send my warmest greetings to the annual New York City Disability Pride Parade. Please accept my best wishes as you celebrate the twenty-sixth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I commend the leading role of New York City in showing the world the pride that people with disabilities have in exercising their civil rights and freedoms.

Worldwide, more than 1 billion people live with disabilities. The United Nations has committed itself since its foundation to the full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of society and development.

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, of which the United States is a signatory. This Convention and the Americans with Disabilities Act share the same goal of the full and equal participation of people with disabilities in society and bring us together to reaffirm our commitment to an inclusive and accessible environment for all.

New York City has an impressive record of promoting accessibility in transportation, public buildings and services. This makes it possible for people with disabilities from all over the world to participate in international meetings here, contributing to your reputation as an inclusive and vibrant global capital.

As the United States continues to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act, let us continue to take concrete action together for inclusive and accessible societies for all.

Crowd of parade marchers wearing purple crowns
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 
Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

New York celebrated the second annual Disability Pride with a colorful parade, marching from Union Square Park to Madison Square Park. Disability Pride NYC is a non-profit started by Mike LeDonne who’s 10 year old daughter is disabled. The mission of Disability Pride NYC is to promote inclusion, awareness, and visibility of people with disabilities, and redefine public perception of disability. Their goal is to establish an annual Disability Pride parade in New York City and to support people with disabilities in whatever way they can.

Two dancers highfiving each other at parade
Photo credit: 
Erik McGregor
Blog
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 10, 2016
City: 
New York
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Types of Culture: 
Subject of Interest: 

Many who have declining health feel ashamed of their bodies, and in time, may also feel ashamed of themselves. Friends stop reaching out as health issues just sound like “drama” to most people who have never faced a health crisis. Some have been forced to leave behind a career, or dreams they once held dear. Although it sounds harsh, it’s not uncommon at all for family members to tease or bully as individuals change physically and/or mentally, leaving them extremely self conscious. People can be very judgmental of body shapes, walking aids, and challenges they don’t understand. Others are quick to call out what they see as “inconsistencies,” even strangers in public call those in wheel chairs “liars” at times when they don’t understand that paralysis isn’t the only reason one might need the aid of wheels.

It’s no wonder that people start to lose their self worth, and isolate themselves as a disability changes them.

You know what? SCREW EVERYONE!

So, this isn’t a news flash, but people don’t get it, and they don’t get you. You, my dear, have so much to be proud of, and SO MUCH to share with the world!

You are an over-comer, a warrior, a never-giving-up wheel rolling, cane sporting, walker toting, re-inventing, hope finding, doing it anyway, sometimes invisible illness (but never invisible)- always working to conquer your challenges: BRAVE fighter! Damn straight you should be proud!!!

You don’t have to prove how much pain you’re in every day, how badly cancer changed your body, you don’t have to show your prosthetic, or tell anyone what your mental illness is… unless you want to. You are living proof of pure strength. You don’t have to work to be an inspiration to anyone, but hey- you already are, kiddo. You’re pretty spectacular just the way you are, in the body you have right now.

Please don’t keep your amazing self on lock down. You’re the only you this world will ever have! Heart (((hugs))) going out.

A group of people holding a sign saying "We have rights"
News
Original Published Date: 
Sunday, July 12, 2015
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.
"We're here full force," said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. "I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life."
Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he's proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.
The grand marshal was former U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.
"I may be retired from the Senate, but I'm not retired from the fight," Harkin said. "We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers."
De Blasio said his administration is "very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going," the mayor said, laughing.
About 4 percent of New York's yellow cabs are accessible, said Allan Fromberg, a spokesman for the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission, compared to London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.
In New York City, de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.
The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

Institution: 
Chron
Participants at the parade getting ready to march
News
City: 
New York
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On Sunday, July 12th, UCP of NYC joined thousands of New Yorkers for the Inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade. With an estimated 200 participants, UCP of NYC was one of the largest groups marching, carrying wonderful awareness-raising signs to celebrate. July has been declared Disability Pride month by Mayor de Blasio and also marks the 25th Anniversary of the signing of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

Thank you to everyone who came out to cheer us on and make the first parade of its kind in NYC a success.

The full story from the Associated Press:

New York City hosted its first parade Sunday supporting people with disabilities, with more than 3,000 participants heading up Broadway using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

"We're here full force," said rapper Namel Norris, 33, now in a wheelchair after being shot in the Bronx and paralyzed as a teenager. "I thought my life was over, but music is my calling, I have a purpose in life."

Mayor Bill de Blasio kicked off the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade, saying he's proud his city is a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.

The grand marshal was former U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, the Iowa Democrat who 25 years ago sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act.

"I may be retired from the Senate, but I'm not retired from the fight," Harkin said. "We know that when companies hire people with disabilities they get the best workers, the most loyal workers, the most productive workers."

De Blasio said his administration is "very, very committed already on the issue of accessible taxis, but all Tom Harkin had to do was say London was doing better to get my competitive fire going," the mayor said, laughing.

About 4 percent of New York's yellow cabs are accessible, said Allan Fromberg, a spokesman for the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission, compared to London, where every taxi can handle wheelchairs.

In New York City, de Blasio declared July as "Disability Pride Month" in honor of the 25th anniversary of the landmark federal act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled "Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement."

Institution: 
United Cerebral Palso
A participant holds a sign saying "I can get there myself, I just need a ramp."
Photo credit: 
Charles Eckert
News
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

About 3,000 people helped raise awareness about physical and mental disabilities during New York City's annual Disability Pride festivities in Manhattan at a rally near Madison Square Park and a parade down Broadway to Union Square.

A very artist wheel for a man's wheelchair
News
City: 
New York
Adjectives: 

This month was full of city parades. Not only that, two weeks ago, the Gay Pride parade was enhanced by the Supreme Court’s gay-marriage decision, but also on Friday, another parade was held, celebrating the U.S women’s soccer team. The Disability Pride Parade, hosted by New York on Sunday completed the parade month. The event, supporting people with disabilities, had more than 3,000 participants using wheelchairs, canes and guide dogs.

Regarding the number of people with disabilities, it seems that about 800,000 New Yorkers are disabled; according to the advocacy group, Center for Independence of the Disabled, New York.
People with Disabilities Cheering and Chanting

The fact that people with disabilities unfortunately tend to be underrepresented in diversity initiatives is well known. This is one of the reasons why seeing the pride parade can be more overwhelming than imagined.

People holding high signs marched down Broadway on Sunday, in the city’s first Disability Pride parade. The atmosphere was more than celebratory.

However, even if this event is desirable, those in the parade, as well as the rest of the people, are aware of the problems that remain, particularly when it comes to employment, housing, discrimination and accessibility.

When addressing the crowd at the inaugural NYC Disability Parade, the Mayor Bill de Blasio showed how proud he was of the city for being a national leader in supporting rights for disabled people.
25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act

An important presence at the Pride Parade had the former Senator Tom Harkin. He was the Iowa Democrat who, 25 years ago, sponsored the Americans With Disabilities Act. The purpose of it is to improve the life of people with disabilities, aiming to guarantee them equal opportunities and rights. He proudly said that he is not going to retire from trying to help people with disabilities integrate with society, even if he retired from the Senate.
Disability Pride Month

July is designated as Disability Pride Month and in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, there were and are many other events specially created for New Yorkers with disabilities.

Read more at Clapway: http://clapway.com/2015/07/13/people-with-disabilities-cheered-and-chant...
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Clapway